Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Sidewalk challenge: A life lesson?

BethAnn and I were out walking a couple of days ago when we encountered a series of chalk warnings on the sidewalk.

"Do not cross this line!" declared the first.

We chuckled, and crossed the line, encountering the same warning a second time, which we also crossed.

The third gave us a real chuckle: "Ant crossing!"

The ants didn't seem to be heeding these signs either, as was apparent by the ant mounds marring the next, more ominous caution:

"Seriously we mean it! Do not cross this line!!"

Two exclamation points indicated there could be real consequences ahead. But like the heedless ants, we walked on, still chuckling, and came to the final admonition:

"Whatever!!"

This cracked us up, but not as much as the final posting placed near the curb just before the street.Three numbered boxes were captioned, "Short Attention Span Hopscotch."

Someone in our neighborhood has a great sense of humor. But in life, we encounter more serious challenges than chalked cautions on a sidewalk.

There are lines we should not cross but do. At first we may hesitate, knowing there could be consequences, but really wanting what's on the other side.

With each stepping over it gets easier. The consequences aren't always readily apparent and so we feel safe in our ignoring of boundaries. Soon, we are crossing lines with abandon, playing a game of "short attention span hopscotch" with our lives.

The reality is that when we ignore God's lines and boundaries, the "whatever" will eventually cost us, maybe in this life, maybe in the next.

Where do you draw the line?
















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Thoughts?

2 comments:

  1. What a word picture on that sidewalk. Thanks for sharing it in your blog.
    Mary Ann Foote

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the comment, Mary Ann! Glad you enjoyed the post. Hope business is booming at http://www.footesvalleyfarm.com!!

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